Dishoom, Edinburgh – restaurant review: Refreshingly remixing Indian dining

Dishoom Edinburgh interior.
Dishoom Edinburgh - 5 minutes before being totally full.

Dishoom, Edinburgh review - "Not dissimilar to dining at a decent tapas restaurant our dishes came thick and fast, as opposed to entrees followed by mains. My central dish of chicken 'Ruby Murray' - love the wink to Cockney rhyming slang possibly referencing Dishoom's London origins - was an absolute belter..."


Excitedly getting ready to see one of the groups that provided the soundtrack to my youth - in the form of the always inventive and enduring Pet Shop Boys - play live in Edinburgh the other day got me thinking about cooking and eating. Bear with me on this one! As for me, food and music have a lot in common. My tastes are really quite broad and varied with regard to both - I'm not a huge fan of 'death metal' however, either as a musical genre or a cuisine.  I'm always looking out for something new and interesting in terms of a dish, tune, restaurant or artist. But I also regularly hanker after the familiar, be it in terms of food or music, although it's always refreshing to encounter an updated take on an old favourite from my younger days.

Vada pau Dishoom Edinburgh.
Vada Pau - spicy chip butty, anyone?
How appropriate then that prior to trotting off to see the PSBs lift the roof on the Edinburgh Playhouse, JML, our friend Tina, and I chose to dine at a relatively new kid on the city's culinary block in the form of Dishoom.  Appropriate, because as someone born and raised in the environs of Birmingham, Indian - or more accurately, Punjabi, Pakistani and Bangladeshi - cuisine was something my younger self was delighted to be constantly familiar with. Yet, like a stunning remix of a favourite tune, Dishoom brings a new perspective on the food of the subcontinent, a world away from the Balti houses of my formative years.

Apparently taking its name from a Hindi term referring to the noise made by a ricocheting bullet or landing punch in Bollywood action films - think "kerpow" in the original 60s Batman TV series - Dishoom is majorly inspired by Bombay's (Mumbai's) Irani cafés.  These were opened by Zoroastrian devotees emigrating from Persia (modern day Iran) from 19th Century onwards.  Now dwindling in number, such venues are about all-day dining, where the well-to-do and those not quite so financially fortunate all rub shoulders together, and food that draws influence from the middle-east and across India arrives fast and fulsome.

Chilli cheese toast - Dishoom, Edinburgh.
Chilli cheese toast - sort of Indian rarebit.
The Edinburgh branch of Dishoom (there are already four, highly regarded, sister venues in central and east London) threw open its doors in the redeveloped southern edge of St Andrew's Square at the end of 2016, and has already had folk, quite literally, queuing out the door as reservations are only taken for parties of six or more. The venue is spread over three floors of a stylish, Victorian former office building, and consists of a buzzing, speakeasy-esque cocktail bar and dining area in the basement, a modest reception area and truly enormous open kitchen at ground level, with stairs to rival Jacob's Ladder leading to the colonial-inspired main dining area above.  Taken in the round, it exhibits all the credentials of a well put together and welcoming dining and supping venue.

Barrelhouse Bar and Grill, Edinburgh restaurant review - A most welcome east-end rollout


Barrelhouse Bar and Grill, Edinburgh - interior.
The Barrelhouse's "smoking" interior.

Barrelhouse Bar & Grill, Edinburgh review - "Finger bowls, extra serviettes and a receptacle for the bones (apologies to non-meat eaters) heralded the arrival of the chicken wings, and pretty glorious they were. Smothered in a rich, tangy, spicy glaze the meat was deliciously tender, sliding off the bone."


As someone whose day job is in communications, I’m well aware of the adage “there’s no such thing as bad publicity”, and this is often true. After all, had it not been for some wannabe local politician moaning on about the look of the Barrelhouse Bar and Grill – located in my old stomping ground of Willowbrae, Edinburgh – which draws its inspiration from New Orleans-style, blues-playing watering holes, I might not have heard about it. Because according to the prospective Edinburgh Councillor, the deep-south themed exterior of this newly opened establishment "does nothing to improve the area”. Unlike the hostelry’s former incarnation as the infamous Jock’s Lodge pub, which laid semi-derelict for years having been closed following it being the scene of a drugs-related assassination attempt? Aye, that really screamed “up and coming neighbourhood” – NOT! But I digress…

Chilli chicken wings - Barrelhouse, Edinburgh.
Finger-lickin' chicken wings.
Approaching the Barrelhouse, it's apparent that the corrugated iron that used to adorn the windows of the old Jock's Lodge has been niftily repurposed to form the place's new signage. I semi-jest, as set against the stylish charcoal grey rendered exterior, emblazoning the bar's name on purposely distressed metal sheeting trendily hints at the venue's southern U-S-of-A theme. Pass through the doors and it's surprising at how TARDIS-like the expanse of the interior is compared to the relatively diminutive frontage. I must confess that given its reputation I never stepped foot in the old Jock's Lodge during the decade I lived in the area, as I am not exactly a fan of a chibbing or ricocheting bullet accompanying a nice glass of Rioja, so I can't compare the new bar's look with its predecessor. But I liked what I encountered; faux-distressed wall and ceiling décor, mix and match vintage furniture, a well presented horseshoe bar adorned with more corrugated iron and stylish neon lighting, and - most importantly - a semi-open grill/kitchen, which contains the "god of hellfire", according to the signage adjacent the pass. The place even houses a modest stage area in order to host live music - smouldering delta blues I would imagine.

Chilli beef taco shell - Barrelhouse, Edinburgh.
Big and bold chilli beef taco shell.
Service was uniformly excellent right from the off, with the extremely welcoming and efficient staff immediately showing me to a table and furnishing me with a smashing pint of American-style rye beer, whilst I perused the Barrelhouse's menu and awaited the arrival of dining partner, JML.  Given the venue's Southern USA theme and the appearance of "grill" in its name, it's unsurprising that American classics and "BBQ" dishes are prominent in its food offering, but the range of starters and mains is more nuanced than standard diner-esque fare, and a squint at the Barrelhouse's Facebook page suggests the menu gets regularly updated.  JML having now arrived, and been speedily supplied with a refreshing pint of continental lager, we dived into placing our order.